What a real toy farm looks like

A couple of weeks ago Zach and I built a farm out of his Duplo bricks. It’s a cosy, family affair, the Duplo farm – more of a hobby smallholding than a serious business enterprise. Toy farms don’t represent the real world very well, it’s fair to say. (Neither do toy trains, which are almost always steam trains, for some reason)

So what would it look like if you made a toy farm that actually reflected modern agriculture? That’s what subversive Dutch toymaker/artist Tomm Velthuis has done with his 21st century pig farm. Designed for an exhibition on meat eating, it comes “complete with 200 pigs, the enormous amounts of food required to fatten them up, the trees that must be cleared for feed crops, and the acid rain caused by the pigs’ manure.”

pig-farm

pig-farm-inside

Tomm’s website also sells organic and standard pigs, and a piglet playset that comes with clippers for chopping off their tails. Ouch.

Tags:

7 Comments on “What a real toy farm looks like”

  1. DevonChap March 8, 2014 at 3:15 pm #

    Toy trains are often steam trains because they have more soul. Not forgetting the wonderful contribution of Rev W Awdry via Britt Allcroft. Against that Chuggington is mostly diesels and electrics and Underground Ernie is totally electric.

    Hornby and Bachmann make a large range of diesels and some electric trains. Just in people’s imaginations steam trains are better.

    It is a very dull world where you make toys that solely reflect the adult world.

    • Jeremy March 8, 2014 at 8:09 pm #

      I don’t feel any great need for realism in anyone’s imaginary worlds, truth be told – though I do wish the trains in Chuggington wouldn’t hop about on their rails.

  2. Kieran Harrod March 8, 2014 at 5:06 pm #

    Not forgetting the correct standard train noise is a steam engine “chugg”.

  3. Samantha Mackay March 16, 2014 at 9:52 am #

    Reblogged this on Ignite Your Senses and commented:
    It’s amazing how making things real for people can increase the impact of the message you are communicating. It is a cross between art and real life, something you can interact with, touch and feel.

    I also love that people will create art about life to change perspectives and create change.

    • Jeremy March 17, 2014 at 9:01 am #

      It’s particularly powerful when you see photos of this particular artwork/toy in the exhibition, as it’s presented on a playtable so that it can actually be played with.

      • Samantha Mackay March 21, 2014 at 8:22 pm #

        Especially when you look at the full photo deck and see all the little packets of different animals and things – it really takes something with personality and makes it a consumer product.

    • treadingmyownpath March 19, 2014 at 1:10 pm #

      That is exactly what I was thinking – except I had no idea how to articulate it! You’ve captured how I was feeling perfectly. You’re so right : )

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: