What we learned this week

  • Britain’s first solar powered bus has taken to the streets. It’s run by community owned operator Big Lemon.
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  • Earlier this week I mentioned that tyre manufacturers are making the next generation of tyres out of dandelions. It’s an extraordinary thing and here’s a little more about why alternatives are necessary, and why dandelions are the answer.
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  • Have you got a business idea that you could submit to the Biophilic design award?
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  • Crowdfunding campaign of the week goes to Deep Time Walk, an app which leads you on a walk back through earth’s ancient history, and that sounds like a great way to find a new appreciation for our planet.
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  • This week I read Curious: The desire to know and why your future depends on it, by Ian Leslie. I saw it in the library, and you already know how it made me feel. The book explores what curiosity is and how it can be nurtured or suppressed in childhood, and the role it plays in our wellbeing and our creativity as adults. The warning in the subtitle comes from the fact that the internet pushes us towards easy answers and shallow engagement with the world, and works against the deepest and most rewarding forms of curiosity. Lots here for anyone interested in childhood imagination, creativity, puzzles and mysteries and how they are different, and why we should ask more questions.

2 Comments on “What we learned this week”

  1. Joe Owens July 9, 2017 at 3:46 pm #

    I just wrote a check for 50 percent of the cost for my 11 kW grid that should be up and running in 30 days.

  2. DevonChap July 11, 2017 at 8:46 am #

    Alternatives to GDP have been a regular feature here. The Indigo prize is looking for those alternatives.

    http://global-perspectives.org.uk/indigo-prize/

    The question is “How would you design a new economic measure for global economies that fully acknowledges not only social and economic factors but the impact of creativity, entrepreneurship and digital skills? How should your new measure be used to improve the way we measure GDP in official statistics?”

    £100,000 prize for the best answer.

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