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china-air-pollution

How China is putting the brakes on coal

Last week I wrote about China and the shift in its energy policy. I mentioned that China is over-investing in coal power, and that the number of power stations being built wasn’t necessarily an indicator of coal use to come. This week we saw confirmation of that problem, as the government instructed 11 different regions […]

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china-coal

Let’s talk about China

China’s role in global climate change is a contentious one. For years it’s been seen as carbon enemy number one, the careless coal consumer condemning us all to climate catastrophe. It was mostly China that scuppered the Copenhagen talks in 2009, and it is generally accepted that it will be impossible to stop runaway climate […]

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reinventing-prosperity

Book review: Reinventing Prosperity

A few weeks ago I was at an event where Graeme Maxton and Jorgen Randers presented some of their thinking from their new book. They gave an overview of thirteen ideas to save the world, which included a number of things I’ve covered on the blog, but presented in a perspective I hadn’t heard before. […]

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Syria-Drought-Hit

Is stopping climate change even possible?

Often when I talk to people about climate change, I get asked if I think it’s even possible to stop it. If you’re involved in climate change action in any way, I imagine you’ve had the same question. It’s an understandable concern, but not a helpful one. I don’t think ‘is is possible?’ is the […]

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ggw_messaging

An update on the Great Green Wall

One of the world’s more ambitious climate change projects is the Great Green Wall, an 8,000km band of trees and plants that crosses the whole of the African continent. It’s central aim is to halt the advance of the desert, but in the process it will create green jobs, protect the soil, and keep people […]

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czfk_xwwqaqg7az-jpg-large

The divestment movement is advancing

For decades, climate change action has focused on carbon emissions, looking at how we could reduce or mitigate the impact of burning fossil fuels. About four or five years ago, emerging out of a post-Copenhagen silence, campaigners began talking about the other end of the supply chain. Rather than reducing emissions, let’s cut to the […]

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abandoned-cars-818

The sources of transport emissions

A few days ago I wrote about why we need to pay more attention to transport emissions. Today I want to look at where transport emissions come from, and what the biggest challenges are. It won’t take long. Here’s a hasty graph drawn from the Committee on Climate Change figures for 2012: For better or […]

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climatecamp2008

Six reasons why Trump could be won over on climate change

There’s been a lot of hand wringing in climate change circles over Donald Trump winning the US elections. Under president Obama, America had finally begun to come round to climate change, at least at the government level. It was very late and hesitant, but finally turning in the right direction. All bets are off with […]

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climate-vulnerable-forum

Dozens of countries aim for 100% renewable energy

After the big events of Paris last year, and with the news dominated by the US elections, there’s been very little coverage of this year’s climate talks in Marrakech. And indeed, no big news was expected this time. You can read the ‘action proclamation‘ if you’re so inclined, and Jeremy Leggett has a good round-up […]

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uk-emissions-2014-decc

Why we need to talk about transport emissions

A couple of weeks ago I said that I’d like to look at transport a bit more, and invited your submissions and ideas. Today I want to briefly explain why I think we need to talk about transport. First of all, here’s a breakdown of Britain’s greenhouse gas emissions for 2014. Energy supply is still […]

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