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Building a long term perspective

I was in a meeting with RSPB Scotland last week, and the subject of long term planning came up. As an example, they mentioned a project in Abernethy that has a particularly bold time scale. The Abernethy Forest is the largest remaining pinewood forest in the Scottish Highlands. It’s home to a variety of wildlife, […]

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Community mangrove restoration in Madagascar

Mangrove swamps are the single most efficient form of forest when it comes to carbon sequestration. I’ve detailed exactly why in previous posts. They also stabilise coastlines, forming a buffer against storms and floods. They serve as nurseries to small fish. Like many environments in the ‘riparian zone’ between land and water, they are very […]

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How rewilding can help to stop floods

Every year flooding costs Britain around a billion pounds. As the climate warms and extreme weather events become more frequent, floods could be more common and more expensive. Severe floods in 2015 have prompted a debate about how to address this growing problem, with the government publishing a new National Flood Resilience Review last week. […]

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A healthcheck on England’s wildlife

Last week I wrote about how wildlife is in decline globally. One of the reasons for the grim statistics is development in previously untouched areas. As countries develop and populations expand, forests are cleared, swamps are drained, and habitats are lost in the process. Nature is squeezed to the margins. Today we see those processes […]

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A world without wildlife?

Of all the things I’ve written about on the blog, this statistic stands out as one of the most stark: since 1970, the world’s wildlife populations have halved. That’s an extraordinary thought. The figure is from the WWF’s Living Planet Index, and it is derived by monitoring the numbers of over 10,000 different populations. Some […]

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It’s National Insect Week

I’ve always liked insects. Not all insects, but ants, termites and beetles in particular. I’ve spent many happy afternoons following ant trails through the woods in Kenya, or picking apart the dirt-covered termite highways running along the tree trunks. In Madagascar I used to swim around the pool with a plank, rescuing the scarabs and […]

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Capturing carbon in the coastlands

One of the main reasons why we are yet to experience the full weight of climate change is that the oceans absorb a lot of the CO2 emissions from human activity. CO2 is absorbed into seawater, and it is also sequestered in plant plankton. This is really useful, but unfortunately neither of these functions can […]

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Is there such as thing as sustainable tuna?

John West is Britain’s leading tuna brand, with a third of sales across the country. Unfortunately they’re also the worst performing tuna brand when it comes to sustainability. Our relationship with the tuna is complicated. First of all, it’s a predator. We don’t tend to eat their land-based equivalents, and would be horrified to find […]

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Why nature connection matters

When I left my house yesterday morning, there was a fine young Douglas Fir tree outside my house. Though it sits just across the fence on the neighbour’s side, it grows over our driveway and gives our bit of the terrace a sense of place. For the 35 odd years it has been there it […]

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Living with mammals

Every spring the People’s Trust for Endangered Species runs a survey on the animals that share Britain’s cities, towns and villages. It’s a useful way of gathering data on urban foxes, badgers, muntjac deer and the many other creatures that live alongside people, often surreptitiously. It helps to track species in decline, such as hedgehogs. […]

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