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solar-train

Indian Railways is putting solar panels on trains

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the possibilities of self-charging solar vehicles, and just how many solar panels you can stick on a car. Here’s a related concept for this edition of ‘transport innovation of the week‘. Indian Railways has been exploring a variety of ways of saving energy and reducing emissions, and […]

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polarfoundation

Building of the week: Princess Elizabeth Antarctica

Heating is the biggest use of energy in a house. That means that generally speaking, the colder the climate, the harder it is going to be to build a zero carbon home. But it should always be possible, and in an age of climate change and rising energy prices, a cold climate is no reason […]

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china-air-pollution

How China is putting the brakes on coal

Last week I wrote about China and the shift in its energy policy. I mentioned that China is over-investing in coal power, and that the number of power stations being built wasn’t necessarily an indicator of coal use to come. This week we saw confirmation of that problem, as the government instructed 11 different regions […]

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80-percent-renewable

A map of the countries with the most renewable energy

One of the more popular posts on this blog over the past few years has been the one on countries with 100% renewable energy. It’s a list that surprises people, as there are plenty of unexpected countries on there. Here’s a map that makes the same point. It shows the countries that generate over 80% […]

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china-coal

Let’s talk about China

China’s role in global climate change is a contentious one. For years it’s been seen as carbon enemy number one, the careless coal consumer condemning us all to climate catastrophe. It was mostly China that scuppered the Copenhagen talks in 2009, and it is generally accepted that it will be impossible to stop runaway climate […]

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green-gas-ecotricity

The importance of green gas

If we take a look at where energy is used in the home, the biggest slice of the pie goes to heating. The second is hot water. Renewable sources of electricity may be proliferating, but renewable heat is the next big challenge. Until we can decarbonise heating, we won’t be able to reduce household emissions […]

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czfk_xwwqaqg7az-jpg-large

The divestment movement is advancing

For decades, climate change action has focused on carbon emissions, looking at how we could reduce or mitigate the impact of burning fossil fuels. About four or five years ago, emerging out of a post-Copenhagen silence, campaigners began talking about the other end of the supply chain. Rather than reducing emissions, let’s cut to the […]

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climate-vulnerable-forum

Dozens of countries aim for 100% renewable energy

After the big events of Paris last year, and with the news dominated by the US elections, there’s been very little coverage of this year’s climate talks in Marrakech. And indeed, no big news was expected this time. You can read the ‘action proclamation‘ if you’re so inclined, and Jeremy Leggett has a good round-up […]

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jlr solar roof

How renewables crowd out fossil fuels

Over the past couple of years it’s been encouraging to see the economics of energy generation turn in favour of renewable energy. The long expected grid parity has been reached in many places, and it’s genuinely cheaper to build renewable capacity rather than burn fossil fuels. In Britain we’ve seen coal use pushed back as […]

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fossil-fuels-and-carbon-budgets

It’s time to stop digging

“One of the most powerful climate policy levers is also the simplest: stop digging for more fossil fuels.” That’s the conclusion of a new report from Oil Change International and a coalition of partners. It’s taken the best available figures of known fossil fuel reserves, and compared them to the carbon budgets. The result is […]

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